CXCL10

CXCL10

Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 10
PDB rendering based on 1o7z.
Available structures
PDB Ortholog search: RCSB
Identifiers
CXCL10 Gene
RNA expression pattern

C-X-C motif chemokine 10 (CXCL10) also known as Interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10) or small-inducible cytokine B10 is an 8.7 kDa protein that in humans is encoded by the CXCL10 gene.[1][2] C-X-C motif chemokine 10 is a small cytokine belonging to the CXC chemokine family.

Gene

The gene for CXCL10 is located on human chromosome 4 in a cluster among several other CXC chemokines.[3]

Function

CXCL10 is secreted by several cell types in response to IFN-γ. These cell types include monocytes, endothelial cells and fibroblasts.[1] CXCL10 has been attributed to several roles, such as chemoattraction for monocytes/macrophages, T cells, NK cells, and dendritic cells, promotion of T cell adhesion to endothelial cells, antitumor activity, and inhibition of bone marrow colony formation and angiogenesis.[4][5]

This chemokine elicits its effects by binding to the cell surface chemokine receptor CXCR3.[6]

Structure

The three-dimensional crystal structure of this chemokine has been determined under 3 different conditions to a resolution of up to 1.92 Å.1o80.

Clinical significance

Baseline pre-treatment plasma levels of CXCL10 are elevated in patients chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) of genotypes 1 or 4 who do not achieve a sustained viral response (SVR) after completion of antiviral therapy.[8][9] CXCL10 in plasma is mirrored by intrahepatic CXCL10 mRNA, and both strikingly predict the first days of elimination of HCV RNA (“first phase decline”) during interferon/ribavirin therapy for all HCV genotypes.[10] This also applies for patients co-infected with HIV, where pre-treatment IP-10 levels below 150 pg/mL are predictive of a favorable response, and may thus be useful in encouraging these otherwise difficult-to-treat patients to initiate therapy.[11]

References

Further reading