Comecrudo language

Comecrudo language


Comecrudo is an extinct Comecrudan language of Mexico. The name Comecrudo is Spanish for "eat-raw"; Carrizo is Spanish for "reed". It was best recorded in a list of 148 words in 1829 by French botanist Jean Louis Berlandier (Berlandier called it "Mulato") (Berlandier et al. 1828–1829). It was spoken on the lower Rio Grande near Reynosa, Tamaulipas, in Mexico. Comecrudo has often been considered a Coahuiltecan language although most linguists now consider the relationship between them unprovable due to the lack of information.

Comecrudo tribal names were recorded in 1748 (Saldivar 1943):

In 1861, German Adolph published a travelogue with some vocabulary (Adolph called the language Carrizo) (Adolph 1961: 185–186). In 1886, Albert Gatschet recorded vocabulary, sentences, and a text from the descendants (who were not fluent) of the last Comecrudo speakers near Camargo, Tamaulipas, at Las Prietas (Swanton 1940: 55–118).