National Freedom Day

National Freedom Day

National Freedom Day is a United States observance on February 1 honoring the signing by Abraham Lincoln of a joint House & Senate resolution that later became the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. President Lincoln signed the Amendment outlawing slavery on February 1, 1865, although it was not ratified by the states until later.

Major Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. As it has every year since, the remembrance included laying a wreath at the Liberty Bell.

National Freedom Day's federal authorization is cited at Cornell University Law School's Legal Information Institute as 36 USC § 124:

§ 124. National Freedom Day The President may issue each year a proclamation designating February 1 as National Freedom Day to commemorate the signing by Abraham Lincoln on February 1, 1865, of the joint resolution adopted by the Senate and the House of Representatives that proposed the 13th amendment to the Constitution.[1]

Richard Wright, a banker and educator, led the campaign to hold such a commemoration and led the first observance in 1942.

On June 30, 1948, President Harry Truman signed a bill proclaiming February 1 as National Freedom Day. [1] It is not a federal holiday; government offices and banks are open for business.

On this day many towns have festivals, while other citizens reflect on the freedoms that the United States honors and to appreciate the goodwill of the United States. Wreath-laying at the Liberty Bell has also been a tradition to mark National Freedom Day for many years. Symbols of the day may include a theme about freedom for all Americans.[2]

According to americaslibrary.gov National Freedom Day is defined as:

"[t]he purpose of this holiday is to promote good feelings, harmony, and equal opportunity among all citizens and to remember that the United States is a nation dedicated to the ideal of freedom. Major Richard Robert Wright Sr., a former slave, fought to have a day when freedom for all Americans is celebrated. When Wright got his freedom, he went on to become a successful businessman and community leader in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Major Wright chose February 1 as National Freedom Day because it was the day in 1865 that President Lincoln signed the 13th Amendment to the Constitution.... The 13th Amendment outlawed slavery in the United States. Wright gathered national and local leaders together to write a bill declaring February 1 "National Freedom Day" and President Harry Truman signed the bill in 1948 making it official."[3]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ [2]
  2. ^ http://www.timeanddate.com/holidays/us/national-freedom-day
  3. ^ http://www.campaignforliberty.com/materials/National_Freedom_Day.pdf